Reaction Time: Q&A with Jim Abbott, Market Manager, Julabo USA, Inc.

PITTCON mascot, Pete Con, standing beside the Julabo reactorNot too long ago, while attending the PITTCON show in Atlanta, Georgia, we came across a unique and eye-catching exhibitor system – a special reactor manufactured by Julabo USA, Inc. featuring two KNF SIMDOS® liquid metering pumps transferring fluids to and from the reactor vessel. The machine is quite intriguing on its own; however, after having noticed the two KNF liquid diaphragm pumps, we contacted Jim Abbot, Market Manager, from Julabo USA, Inc. to learn more about the company’s impressive reactor.

1. Overall, what is the purpose of this reactor, what exactly does it do? Does it have an official name?

“We typically just refer to the small reactors of 100mL to 5L size as ‘bench scale’ or ’bench top reactor’, and the 10L to 100L sizes as ’kilo-scale pilot plant reactors’. Systems are available in both glass and stainless steel. Also, we are proud to be the US distributor of Berghof high pressure reactor systems – these have a ton of applications which they are used for but typical uses include: pharma, bio-pharma, plastics, paints, polymers, adhesives, petrochemical, energy, and most recently cannabis. The reactors are primarily used in mixing applications but with add-on features they can be easily equipped for various distillation methods such as: refluxing, short path and fractional distillation. All of our units are automation capable and can be easily controlled using our PC or PLC based AUTOReactor™ control and data logging packages.”

2. What is the function of the two KNF SIMDOS® pumps used within the Julabo reactor?

SIMDOS_Pumps_2 SIMDOS_pumps_1“We use the KNF pumps to control liquid additions or product sampling. The KNF SIMDOS pumps are used, specifically, because of their high quality, reliability, and automation capability. The pumps are connected to our PC or PLC based AUTOReactor™ control and data logging packages which allows users to program and control the process quite effectively and efficiently.”

3. I noticed that the reactor uses both KNF SIMDOS 10, and SIMDOS 02 pumps. Is there a reason why two different KNF SIMDOS pump types were selected?

“We displayed both [pumps] on [our demo] system, but typically we use the SIMDOS 02 on the bench scale reactors, while the SIMDOS 10 is used on the kilo-scale reactors. This is because of their different delivery rates as associated with the scale of the process, but quite often these are used interchangeably across both platforms.”

4. Is there any particular reason that compelled the system’s designer to choose KNF pumps over other dosing pumps from other pump manufacturers?

“We (Julabo) have had a long relationship with KNF both in the USA, and around the world. Moreover, we know without a doubt that KNF has the same principals as JULABO as far as delivering high-quality, reliable products.”

5. Will the Julabo reactor(s) be featured at the ACS tradeshow next week?

“Yes it will; we plan to display it again with the [KNF SIMDOS] pumps in a different configuration but always taking front stage, hand-in-hand with the JULABO products.”

6. Would you like to share any additional facts, or interesting notes regarding this system?

“We are devoted to offering our expertise in temperature control and reaction systems to our customers. Likewise, we are dedicated to providing solutions, from the inception of a process, through scale-up, and into manufacturing. One of the key factors is we design all of our systems with the utmost flexibility so as processes change, and companies grow we to can change and grow together with them.”

Julabo will be exhibiting at the upcoming ACS tradeshow in Philadelphia on August 21-23, 2016. If you will be attending the show, then be sure to check out Julabo’s incredible reactor system(s) incorporating KNF SIMDOS dosing/metering pumps. Also, don’t forget to visit KNF booth #1626 to see our latest laboratory technology, including: SIMDOS 10 and SIMDOS 02 liquid metering/dosing pumps, LABOPORT diaphragm vacuum pumps, LIQUIPORT liquid transfer pumps, the versatile VC 900 vacuum controller, and KNF’s award-winning RC 900 rotary evaporator.

Safe, Gas-tight Transfer of Dangerous and/or Expensive Media

The following is a case study presenting the issues encountered and overcome when problem-solving a pyrophoric gas transfer application with KNF customer, Air Products and Chemicals.

INTRODUCTION

Spontaneously-Combustible-SignAir Products is a leading international manufacturer of industrial gases and chemicals. With a staff of over 21,000, the company, based in Pennsylvania, operates in 50 countries across the globe and supplies a wide variety of processing media for myriad applications and industries.

Among goods produced specifically for the semiconductor and solar industry, Air Products manufactures a special gas mixture employed in etching and gas deposition processes to coat silicon wafers and glass substrates; these methods help, for example, to create the active films in flat panel displays and solar cells.

Owing to their pyrophoric properties, the utmost care is required both when manufacturing and using these gases. All system components that store or transfer the gases must therefore prevent air contamination. Should such gases come into contact with air, an exothermic reaction takes place in which a telltale oxidation product is created and deposited in the form of a white coating.

>> Read the Complete Case Study

New KNF Laboratory Products Catalog Available

KNF Neuberger Inc. has recently published an updated Laboratory Products Catalog. The 33-page catalog reflects the newly expanded range of laboratory products offered by KNF Neuberger, Inc. which includes: a complete line of vacuum pumps and accessories, liquid transfer pumps, dosing/metering pumps, rotary evaporators, and vacuum systems.

Organized by application, this comprehensive guide presents the best product selections for rotary evaporation/distillation, degassing, filtration/SPE, fluid aspiration, gel drying, centrifugal concentration, vacuum ovens, multi-user vacuum systems, and metering and transferring liquid. In addition, this piece includes handy product charts for easy comparison.

View the new Laboratory Products Catalog here. Or, request a high-resolution printed version via postal mail by completing the form below.

KNF Exhibiting at the World’s Largest Printing Equipment Show

reprographic printingAs a trusted partner to many of the world’s leading industrial reprographic printer manufacturers, KNF is preparing to showcase its latest product developments at Drupa 2016. Considered the world’s largest printing equipment exhibition, Drupa is open every three years in Dusseldorf, Germany. This year, the show runs from May 31st through June 10th, and KNF is excited to be a part of it.

At the show, KNF will be exhibiting its latest product developments including liquid pumps with flow rates from microLiters/min to 12 L/min+ and gas pumps with flow rates from microLiters to 300 L/min. Additionally, KNF offers a wide selection of pumps that can be optimized for specific needs through engineer-to-engineer collaboration. Optional materials, motor types, fluid connections and other modifications are available to optimize performance, life, and cost at any quantity.

KNF liquid and gas pumps perform important ink handling tasks, including the ink transfer to print heads, ink degassing, print head cleaning, vacuum generation for print head meniscus control, and ink circulation. From continuous inkjet to drop-on-demand, from large format printing to product barcoding, KNF has the pumps needed for high-quality, consistent printing.

Please plan to stop by our booth in Hall 4, booth B01 if you will be attending Drupa 2016. To learn more about KNF pumps for reprographic printing visit www.knfusa.com/reprographics or read our related Application Notes:

KNF Associates Discuss MedTech Pump Design Trends with MDDI

Pumps for Medical TechnologyThe following excerpt is from the MDDI article, “Pump Designs Flow Toward Smaller Sizes“.


As medical devices require smaller pumps that fulfill rigorous design requirements, the relationship between OEMs and suppliers is shifting.

A medical device that manages the movement of a gas or a fluid relies on a pump to carry out the application. Advances in technology enable pump suppliers to provide pumps capable of addressing increasingly complex medical device requirements. But industry pressures are also changing the nature of the relationship between OEMs and their suppliers.

At one time, medical device companies looked at suppliers simply as a way to outsource work and reduce costs, said Dave Vanderbeck, business development manager for Trenton, NJ-based KNF Neuberger. While suppliers can help OEMs reduce their costs, Vanderbeck increasingly now sees OEMs turning to their pump suppliers for design expertise.

Read the full article at MDDIonline.com >>

Trade Show Demo Features KNF Micro Vacuum Pump

Throughout the year, we’ve noticed a demonstration unit that caught our attention on the show floors of BIOMEDevice San Jose, SLAS and MD&M West. This demo – created and displayed by AllMotion – highlights the ability of their four-axis controller board, and utilizes a KNF Micro Gas Pump to create vacuum for stacking and unstacking marbles at a dizzying speed. AllMotion is a California-based manufacturer of stepper drives, stepper controllers, servo drives and servo controllers.

The demo illustrates the ability of the AllMotion board to run motors through four axis of movement and calculate the associated trajectories, while simultaneously running the KNF Micro Gas Pump, a vacuum switch, limit switches, and LEDs – all in a perfectly-timed ballet of motion.

Continue reading

KNF OEM Diaphragm Pumps Used in Multiple Environmental Studies

A customer recently brought five environmental studies, ranging from 2013 to 1996, to our attention. Each of the studies details research conducted with one common component: a KNF OEM pump, which proved integral for sample collection or transfer during the analyses. Of the five studies, we cherry-picked two air-toxics studies for your further reading. However, here’s the listing of all five:

  1. Walter 2013 High Res Measurements Atmospheric Hydrogen West African Coast Mauritania
  2. Querino 2011 Methane Flux Vertical Gradient Mixing Ratio Measurements in a Tropical Forest
  3. Bailey 2010 Southwest Indianapolis Air Toxics Study
  4. Romashkin 2001 In Situ Measurements Long Lived Trace Gases Lower Stratosphere Gas Chromatography
  5. Elkins 1996 Airborne Gas Chromatography In Situ Measurements Long Lived Species Upper Troposphere Lower Stratosphere

KNF Environmental Pumps for Gas Sampling and AnalysisWe’re very proud KNF pumps are relied upon within ambient, source and portable devices for environmental sample collection and analysis. For example, the 2010 study listed above details a project in which the Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM), the U.S. EPA, the City of Indianapolis, and a diverse group of stakeholders teamed up to conduct an air toxics study in southwestern Indianapolis, Indiana (this region was identified by the U.S. EPA National Air Toxics Assessment [NATA] in 1996 and 1999 to be an area of potential concern for cancer risk from air toxics).

A KNF pump was used to enable the analysis of the total non-methane organic carbon (TNMOC) concentration of ambient air. For a history lesson, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 required the EPA’s Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards to set National Ambient Air Quality Standard for the “criteria” pollutant, ozone. In areas of the country where the NAAQS for ozone is being exceeded, additional measurements of the ambient nonmethane organic compound (NMOC) concentration are needed to assist the affected States in developing revised ozone control strategies. Measurements of ambient NMOC are important to the control of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are precursors to atmospheric ozone.

Therefore, a reliable pump was essential for the collection of air samples with potentially harmful toxics. Simultaneously, it was critical for the pump to collect samples in a manner that didn’t change or contaminate the samples. KNF pumps, known for their reliability and chemical inertness, are ideally situated for this type of application. Additionally, their extremely high gas tightness allows for the accurate and complete collection of media, without the risk of sample loss, dilution, or contamination.

Also, in 2001, a study, titled In Situ Measurements of Long-Lived Trace Gases in the Lower Stratosphere by Gas Chromatography, utilized the KNF NMP 830 pump (referenced as UNMP 830 pump in article) . For this study, a four-channel gas chromatograph measured different air qualities in 70 and 140 second intervals. Air external to the aircraft was delivered to the instrument from an external, variable speed, two-stage, KNF diaphragm pump, driven by a brushless 24-V DC motor. The KNF pump was mounted on the aft wall, and was turned on by the ACATS-IV onboard computer when the ER-2 aircraft ascended through 87 kPa of atmospheric pressure.

Regarding this second study, there are a few points of interest we’d like our readers to note. First, the usage of the pump is a prime example of KNF application flexibility. The KNF NMP 830 micro pump is small; however, its footprint isn’t the only reason it was relied upon within this challenging design. For example, the pump in this application is pulling atmospheric samples at an extremely high altitude, measuring parts per billion (ppb) and parts per trillion (ppt). Expectedly, pump inertness is therefore paramount. Much like in the first study referenced above, environmental analysis customers have come to rely on KNF pump material options, including PTFE and stainless steel, and on the leak tightness of KNF pumps.

Additionally, the KNF pump used in this second study is driven by a brushless DC (BLDC) motor, which helps meet the small size mandate. BLDC allows flow rates to be adjusted as needed, helping to extend the lifecycle and reliability of a device. Motor adjustment is also particularly important for this application, because at high elevations, fewer air molecules are available to blow across the pump for cooling. Therefore, the pump faces the risk of overheating. However, the ability to adjust and operate the motor at a lower voltage and speed helps to mitigate this concern. The small and lightweight design of KNF micro gas pumps even allows for energy-efficient battery operation.

Also of note, there’s far less ambient pressure at the elevation at which the pump in this study is operating, resulting in less pressure on both the top and undersides of the diaphragm. This condition is certainly not ideal for pump operation, which further adds to the difficulty of this application. This, and the other challenges presented by high altitude operation and ppb/ppt detection require a specification-driven, individually-tailored pump. KNF excels in designing and configuring pumps to exacting requirements such as these. In fact, over 80 percent of KNF’s business involves custom-engineered pump solutions.

To round out this review, the first and second studies listed above used KNF pumps to flush sample flasks prior to sampling, and to collect and fill flasks, respectively. The last study used a KNF pump to collect samples in a high altitude study with a set-up similar to the Romashkin 2001 study, which was discussed above.

Summing up this entry to The Pump Post, each of the five studies offers a constant theme of KNF OEM pumps being well-suited for environmental sample collection and analysis applications. Please check back to learn more about KNF products in real-world applications!