A Simple Lab Equipment Change with an Immediate, Positive Environmental Impact

Right now there is a considerable water shortage throughout the United States, particularly in California, and other Western states. Drought conditions and other environmental factors have wreaked havoc on local agriculture, while the growing water demand of a steadily increasing population has led to a severe water scarcity situation. Moreover, what is currently limited to the Western United States will soon extend throughout the entire country; according to the U.S. Government Accountability Office – 40 of 50 states have at least one region that’s expected to face some kind of water shortage within the next 10 years. This growing national emergency should serve as considerable cause for concern as there are few natural resources as vital to our very survival than water. This isn’t just a U.S. problem either. The water crisis is even worse in other parts of the world where the infrastructure to collect and/or distribute water is poor or non-existent. It would appear that this is, in fact, everybody’s problem.

water aspiratorThe good news is that, while everyone is affected by this water shortage, there are steps that anyone can take to help address and improve the issue. In fact, making one simple change to your laboratory equipment can help save over 50,000 gallons of water per year! In a recent article published by Laboratory Equipment, KNF Laboratory Products Manager, Roland Anderson explains why you should get rid of your water aspirator.

Read article: “Last Word: Why You Should Get Rid of Your Water Aspirator” (Laboratory Equipment, Sep. 2015) >>

Also notable: “Water Aspirators: Cheap Pumps with Environmental Impact and High Operating Costs” >>

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