KNF to Host Lab Pumps & Applications Symposium in Collaboration with Local ACS

Pumps are an important component in practically all chemistry laboratories. Yet for such a common device, selecting the correct pump for a particular application is often a challenge.

Join us for a Laboratory Pumps and Applications Symposium

Join us on Nov. 4th for a Laboratory Pumps & Applications Symposium

KNF Neuberger, in collaboration with the Trenton Section of the American Chemical Society, will be hosting a symposium on “Laboratory Pumps and Applications”. The presentation will focus on taking the mystery out of laboratory pumps, looking at the most common applications and the pumps that best support them. Discussion topics include:

  • What is the best pump type for my application?
  • What accessories are available to help me optimize the performance of the pump in my application?
  • What are the signs that my pump is in need of maintenance or repair?
  • And much more!


LOCATION

This exclusive, co-sponsored event will be held at KNF’s state-of-the-art, 50,000 square ft. manufacturing facility at Two Black Forest Road in Trenton, NJ.

SCHEDULE
5:30 pm – Mixer with drinks and appetizers, plant tours and product demos
6:30 pm – Dinner and presentation
7:30 pm – Coffee and dessert
Refreshments and dinner are complimentary. There will also be a drawing for door prizes.

PRESENTER
Roland Anderson is the Laboratory Products Manager and applications specialist at KNF Neuberger, Inc.

RSVP
Reservations are required, as seating is limited, so be sure to register now!

A Simple Lab Equipment Change with an Immediate, Positive Environmental Impact

Right now there is a considerable water shortage throughout the United States, particularly in California, and other Western states. Drought conditions and other environmental factors have wreaked havoc on local agriculture, while the growing water demand of a steadily increasing population has led to a severe water scarcity situation. Moreover, what is currently limited to the Western United States will soon extend throughout the entire country; according to the U.S. Government Accountability Office – 40 of 50 states have at least one region that’s expected to face some kind of water shortage within the next 10 years. This growing national emergency should serve as considerable cause for concern as there are few natural resources as vital to our very survival than water. This isn’t just a U.S. problem either. The water crisis is even worse in other parts of the world where the infrastructure to collect and/or distribute water is poor or non-existent. It would appear that this is, in fact, everybody’s problem.

water aspiratorThe good news is that, while everyone is affected by this water shortage, there are steps that anyone can take to help address and improve the issue. In fact, making one simple change to your laboratory equipment can help save over 50,000 gallons of water per year! In a recent article published by Laboratory Equipment, KNF Laboratory Products Manager, Roland Anderson explains why you should get rid of your water aspirator.

Read article: “Last Word: Why You Should Get Rid of Your Water Aspirator” (Laboratory Equipment, Sep. 2015) >>

Also notable: “Water Aspirators: Cheap Pumps with Environmental Impact and High Operating Costs” >>

Water Aspirators: Cheap Pumps With Environmental Impact & High Operating Costs

Application Note: LabWater Aspirators are a common way of creating a low strength vacuum for many standard laboratory applications. Their simple design employs water running through a narrowing tube to create a reduced pressure via the Venturi effect. The pump’s performance is dependent upon the temperature and pressure of the water, two variables that often change based on the number of users and the ambient temperature, resulting in an unreliable vacuum source. In addition, when being used in chemistry and biology labs, aspirators allow potentially hazardous solvents to mix into the water stream and flow down the drain. Since a stream of continuously running water is required to operate the pump, a significant amount of water is wasted. The cost of water coupled with the environmental impact of wasted water and solvent pollution need to be considered.

With concern over water usage on the rise, use of aspirator pumps is understandably under scrutiny due to their excessive water consumption. A typical aspirator pump requires 1.5 – 2.0 gallons of water per minute to operate.3 Assuming an average of 1.75 gal/min and an average usage of 3 hours per day, 4 days a week for 10 months a year, one aspirator pump uses more than 50,000 gallons (189,000 Liters) per year! To put this amount of water in perspective, it is equivalent to:
Water Aspirator

  • 39,062 flushes of a low-flow toilet.4
  • 3,215 eight-minute showers, or a single shower lasting 416 hours.4
  • Washing 1,852 loads of laundry.4
  • 1.4 years’ worth of water consumed by the average American household for outdoor uses (watering lawns and gardens, etc.).5
  • 1,250 cars washed at a water-efficient car wash facility.6

When one considers the number of facilities with multiple water aspirators in operation, these numbers become staggering! >> Click here to view the full Application Note.

Adding Convenience to Field Filtration, Thanks to the New Mini-LABOPORT® Pump

Field Filtration Pump

Filtration of field water samples is not that easy. In discussions with customers, they’ve mentioned three alternatives that are available to accomplish the task, none of which are ideal:

  • Use a manual vacuum pump. However, manual pumps can be weak and therefore very slow. And, they can wear you out if you have a lot of samples or ones with moderate-to-heavy particulates.
  • Use a generator to power a standard lab bench vacuum pump. This option requires transporting the heavy generator and gasoline to the field water site.
  • Transport samples back to the lab. Transportation requires the extra step of packaging the unfiltered samples, and means a delay in getting results and possible degradation of the sample depending on what is being collected and/or tested.

KNF engineers decided that a fourth option would be useful to field scientists, so they developed the new lightweight 12 volt mini-LABOPORT pump, model PJ26078-811. Designed specifically for in-the-field use where vehicle access is possible, it combines the robust operation of the traditional KNF LABOPORT pump with the ability to be powered via 12V DC car outlet. Therefore, field scientists can now rely on a lightweight oil-free vacuum source in environments where weight, portability, space, and timeliness often factor into operation.

KNF LABOPORT 12V Field Filtration PumpEquipped with a three-meter long, coiled power cord fitted with a 12 volt car outlet adaptor cord and two 1/4” hose barbs for vacuum inlet and outlet, the new 12 volt mini-LABOPORT pump is ideally suited for filtration and gas sampling in the field. Its combination of compact convenience and reliable performance allow it to meet the needs of environmental companies, water treatment plants, field researchers, and anyone in need of a convenient vacuum source in remote locations.

Employing a compact, low-maintenance design, the pump is driven by a sturdy motor and features chemically-resistant construction. Providing up to 11 L/min flow at atmosphere, it offers 75 Torr (100 mbar) end vacuum.

To learn more, click here, and refer to model PJ26078-811, which is the first product listed in the chart on the resulting page. Or, contact us to discuss your particular needs.

10 Questions With… Michelle Taylor (Part 2)

Michelle Taylor Laboratory Equipment MagazineToday we conclude our “10 Questions with…” interview of Michelle Taylor, Editor-in-Chief of Laboratory Equipment magazine.

Click here to read the first installment of this conversation.

6. As internet and social media use grow in our industry, have manufacturers expanded their communications to provide technical data and guidance on the proper use of key laboratory equipment in these channels?

My experience has been that manufacturers have capitalized on social media channels, but not necessarily to provide technical data. I think most people see social media as an “outlet,” meaning they are anticipating/expecting less technical, more “fun” information. Most manufacturers use social media as a means to converse with their existing and potential customers, using interesting, meaningful information and data to suck them in. Once you get the customer on your site, that’s when you hit them with the technical data and guidance. Not everyone wants that kind of information filling up their leisure time, so I think it’s best to entice them first, and then let them find what they are looking for from there.

7. Do you see the remote control of laboratory equipment as a growing trend?

Yes times 100. The remote control of everything is a trend, and it’s amplified in the laboratory. It’s one of the rare times science is ahead of the consumer world in terms of trends. Remote control of laboratory equipment is so important that it’s hard to know where to start. I conduct reader surveys every month and in the past four or five years, ease-of-use is the capability our readers have expressed the most interest in. And there’s nothing easier than using a remote to control your lab equipment from a distance. It saves time and money, increases productivity and makes researchers happy- what’s not to love? More importantly though, remote control increases lab safety and aids energy efficiency. Having the ability to control a pump or other piece of equipment inside a fume hood without opening the sash will prove vital in future research endeavors.

8. With the growth of Green Initiatives, do you see more laboratory equipment shifting to less hazardous materials of construction with more sophisticated monitoring and control features?

Yes, but I would downplay the green initiatives part- in a way at least. A few years ago when green was a buzzword, the industry started changing in an effort to accommodate this shift. So we did see a rise in less hazardous materials, better monitoring, smarter construction, etc. Since then though, green has become less of a buzzword and more like something we just accept in society. I think companies are shifting to more energy-efficient and eco-friendly options now not because it’s the “cool new thing,” but because it is what is expected- like stopping at a red light. Green initiatives are not so much initiatives anymore as they are just a part of how we conduct business in the real world. So, yes to smarter, better, more eco-friendly options, but no to green initiatives as a directive.

9. What do you think is the biggest pain-point for lab teams across the globe? How do they address this?

I addressed this briefly in question 7, but I’d say ease-of-use. Researchers everywhere are demanding easier-to-use instrumentation and software. There’s a shortage of experienced personnel, and labs everywhere are feeling that constrain. Therefore, instrumentation and software must be easier to use so novice users can handle the demands, while experienced researchers turn their attention toward more revenue-generating opportunities and research. Manufacturers are already addressing this with simple, familiar, consumer-driven interfaces for software, as well as advanced platforms that guide and help researchers. They are also investing in ways to simplify complex instrumentation, like spectrometers and chromatographs. Two years ago, for example, Waters debuted their QDa detector, which brings push-button mass spec to chromatography applications. I think we will begin to see a lot of more of this.

10. Finally, to end our conversation on a light note, please tell our readers what your favorite city across the globe is.

Hm, this is a hard one. Can I pick two? Actually, I don’t care, I have to pick two. Assisi (Italy) and Galway (Ireland) are my favorites. Climbing the hill to get up to Assisi is unreal. I thought I was going to pass out. But it is all worth it when you get to the top. The view is breathtaking, especially at sunset or during a storm.

In reference to Galway, I swear the greens and blues in Ireland are different than in the U.S. Nature is just better there—the grass is greener, the sky is bluer and the contrast is prettier. Plus, there are lambs everywhere- and lambs are too cute.

10 Questions With… Michelle Taylor (Part 1)

Michelle Taylor Laboratory Equipment MagazineOn this last day at  #pittcon15, we’re excited to introduce a new feature from The Pump Post, the “10 Questions with…” series, in which we interview notables from the science world. Please enjoy Part 1 of our interview with Michelle Taylor, from Laboratory Equipment magazine. Part 2 of this interview will be published on the final day of ACS Spring, March 24, 2015.

1. What is your role at Laboratory Equipment magazine?

I am the Editor-in-Chief of the Laboratory Equipment brand. The brand includes the flagship monthly print magazine, which has been published for over 50 years, as well the associated website and e-newsletters. It also comprises other print and digital supplements, including Chromatography Techniques, Academic Sourceguide and LabOutlook. It’s a neat position to be in because—forgive the cliché—I really do learn something new every day. Between research news published on our website daily, and my interviews with fascinating scientists and thought-leaders, it would be impossible not to learn. I feel like I’m in an interesting science class, and they pay me to attend rather than vise-versa!

2. What lab trends captured your interest in 2014?

One of the elements that became clear to me in the beginning of 2014 was the increased role of microscopy in the routine analytical process. Scientists need more precise high-res techniques, as evidenced by Eric Betzig sharing a piece of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his super-res microscopy techniques. With microscopy growing as fast and drastically as it is, I saw a lot of interest in hybrid and hyphenated systems in 2014. Microscopy was teamed with everything from an EDS spectrometer to a MALDI TOF/TOF in the battle to see and measure on an increasingly small scale. This dependence on and evolution of microscopy will only grow as imaging’s role in science is expected to skyrocket in the next decade.

Another trend was instrument miniaturization. While that has been an idea for a while, it became particularly evident in 2014 with compact spectrometers. Packing the capabilities of a spectrometer into an instrument just a tad bigger than the human hand is an incredible accomplishment. This will undoubtedly advance the idea of personal spectrometers for “home use,” such as checking your water to see if it is contaminated, as well as point-of-case applications in the clinical setting.

3. What are some of the biggest drivers for evolution in the industry? Is it a particular need from lab personnel? Better technology? New applications?

I see societal needs as the biggest driver of the science industry. Just as the commercial industry runs on supply and demand, the science industry reacts to what is happening around it. The changing climate is something we will have to adapt to, and it’s the scientists that will help us do that. Climate change encompasses numerous industries in science, but specifically, I think developments in food and energy will be biggest drivers for evolution.

Additionally, we will, of course, benefit from better technology—this trend will not stop for a number of years. We are in the middle of a technological revolution, so we might as well grab hold and reap the benefits. I am hoping we will see an increase in knowledgeable lab personnel, but I fear we may still be years away from that. As a country, I don’t think we have found the correct higher education formula to produce experienced lab personnel. But, hands-on programs, fellowships and internships are growing, so we’re headed in the right direction.

4. With 2014 in the books, do you have any predictions or expectations for the lab world in the coming year?

Absolutely. I expect this to be a big year for nanotechnology and biotechnology/biomedical. Nanotechnology is fast becoming one of the biggest industries we’ve seen in a while- the applications just keep growing. It deals with anything from water contamination to medicine to natural gas and petroleum. In 10 years’ time, I think nanotechnology research and breakthroughs will play a role in almost every aspect of our lives, whether it’s in the forefront (like e-screens) or in the background (like medication).

Biotechnology’s main capabilities lie in medicine, fuel and food, which also happen to be arguably the three most important elements of humans’ future existence. The baby boomers are all grown up now and experiencing a higher life expectancy than anticipated. Fuel is a problem on Earth and in space. We only just started making our own plutonium-238 to fuel our rockets, and political agendas raise questions about fuel to feed our cars. Fracking is a major controversy, as well as the Keystone XL. I expect science, specifically biotechnology, to play an increasing role in solving these problems. Lastly, “soon” there will not be enough food to feed the growing population. I think biotechnology will have its biggest impact here. The manipulation of food, or genetically modified organisms, is one of the only ways to ensure a safe, healthy food supply for years to come.

5. With the current economic climate within the laboratory industry, how do you see the impact of used equipment on the market?

Used equipment definitely has its place in the scientific market, as does new equipment. I view them as a kind of ying and yang. Both are important, and both are crucial to discovery and innovation. Used equipment always get more attention in times of economic distress (as it should) because for some labs, it provides the only alternative to keep going. That’s an important role to have, and it further emphasizes the impact used equipment can have on the market.

Enhanced Line of Liquid Laboratory Pumps

It’s day two here at #pittcon15 in New Orleans. If you are here at the conference and have not yet had a chance to stop by KNF booth #2211, please plan to do so. One of our features at this year’s show is the recently enhanced line of SIMDOS 10 liquid laboratory pumps.

KNF's SIMDOS 10 liquid laboratory pump

SIMDOS 10 pumps are ideal for metering and dosing applications in a number of professional and academic fields, including: chemistry, pharmaceutical, food research, and polymers, to name a few. SIMDOS 10 pumps offer lab personnel the ability to transfer liquids (up to 500 centistokes*) at flow rates of 1-100 mL/min, with dose volumes from 1 mL to 999 mL.

“While the SIMDOS 10 and SIMDOS 02 pumps can move liquids quickly and accurately, their real strengths are configuration and control options which can be matched to a user’s automation requirements and/or chemical profile” said Dan McDougall, Senior Manager of Laboratory Products at KNF. Indeed the SIMDOS pumps are designed to allow for convenient control of lab metering/dosing tasks which may be repetitive and redundant.

For example, new to this latest version of the SIMDOS 10 is a Cycle Metering Mode. “Say you’re performing an automated fill of vials on a conveyor belt…”, explains MacDougall. “You can program the SIMDOS to dispense a discrete volume into each vial with set pause durations in-between.” This new feature allows the user to set the number of cycles, the pause duration, and the dosing volume.

In addition to the added convenience of the Cycle Metering Mode, there are a few new control type options now available for the  SIMDOS 10. First, the SIMDOS 10 is now available in an RCP-version, which includes a RS 232 interface, enabling ASCII character control of virtually all pump functions, plus the ability to use programmable lab control software such as LABVIEW, or KNF’s free PC control software (available for download at knfusa.com). Next, an RC-version is available, which includes an RC cable for external control options such as a foot switch, or analog PC control. Finally, the standard S-version of the SIMDOS relies on the manual on-board interface with back-lit display for intuitive, push-button operation.

For a demonstration of the SIMDOS 10 and 02 lab liquid pumps, click the video below courtesy of Jean Delteil, KNF Liquid Pumps Product Manager; or stop by PITTCON booth #2211 for a live demo.

* Please visit knfusa.com/SIMDOS10 for detailed performance specifications.