KNF LAUNCHES NEW COMPACT HIGH-FLOW GAS PUMP

NMP830.1.2 HP from KNF

KNF has introduced new micro gas pump NMP830 HP for OEM customers. This new diaphragm pump offers outstanding high flow, pressure, and suction performance in a compact size. It is ideal for medical therapy, monitoring, and reprographic applications.

Compact NMP830 HP measures just 31mm (1.25”) in width. Yet it produces free flow up to 5.5 L/min with a single head design and to 10 L/min with a dual head. Furthermore, this pump produces best-in-class pressure of up to 3.0 bar g (43.5 psig) and vacuum down to 50 mbar absolute (28.4 inHg).*

The new NMP830 HP is an extension of KNF’s NMP series. This latest addition to the line offers a 33 – 44% increase in flow-to-size ratio compared to existing NMP850 and NMP830 models, respectively. Vacuum and pressure performance are also significantly improved at a comparatively smaller size and lower weight.

Thanks to its compact size, high performance, and quiet operation, the NMP 830 HP pump is particularly well-suited for use in patient monitoring, wound and compression therapy, and respiratory care devices. Additional applications that will benefit from the pump’s features include environmental and security monitors, inkjet printing and color printers/plotters, lab equipment, fuel cell technology, and more.

Available with brushed and 2- or 4-wire brushless DC motors. Standard offerings include EPDM and PPS wetted components. All KNF pumps are engineered for success by optimizing pump solutions to meet customer’s specific requirements.

*NMP830.3 HP model.  Contact us for more information.

 

For more information, please visit www.knfusa.com/NMP830HP

KNF pumps launched into space

Liquid pumps made by pump technology leader KNF were on board an HTV-7 unmanned cargo spacecraft launched from Japan on September 23, 2018. Destined for the International Space Station (ISS), the spacecraft and its vital payload successfully docked three days later.

KNF’s first ever space-worthy liquid pumps are part of a new Life Support Rack for the International Space Station. Also known as an Advanced Closed Loop System (ACLS), the rack purifies air and produces oxygen for the ISS. It was developed by Airbus Defence and Space for the European Space Agency (ESA).

Engineers at KNF Flodos AG in Switzerland worked with Airbus for four years to specify and design the pump, which is based on KNF’s proven FEM 1.09 dosing pump. The project was part of Airbus’s COTS (commercial off-the-shelf) program, which uses well-established components to reduce the price tag for space flight.

The new ACLS rack will be installed in the ISS’s Destiny module (also known as the US Lab) by ESA astronaut and ISS commander Alexander Gerst on November 2, 2018. The technology is critical for achieving the closed loop life support system necessary for human space flight beyond low Earth orbit.

The two KNF pumps form part of an electrolyzer that produces oxygen and hydrogen from water. The pumps transfer supply water from a plastic bag into the ACLS, a key job since the oxygen produced is used to replenish the cabin air. The ACLS uses a Sabatier reactor to further increase system efficiency and reduce water consumption on the station.KNF Space Pump

According to the Senior Engineer at KNF Flodos in Switzerland, this was a unique and exciting opportunity for the engineering team. “Complying with the specifications for the COTS program was an interesting and challenging task. We had to keep the key components of the standard FEM 1.09 pump to ensure it maintained its reliability and specifications but make significant design modifications.”

The new, space-worthy KNF pump features several adaptations to the pump exterior, including:

  • Stainless steel housing
  • Vacuum-rated ball bearings
  • Stainless steel fittings for the fluid connections
  • Integration of a space-rated drive motor (which had to be achieved within a very short timeframe).

KNF is proud to have taken part in this project with Airbus Defense and Space and to prove that KNF was able to provide a solution for this demanding application.

ISS

ISS

Pumping Above Our Weight Class

NMP 03 Micro Gas Pump
The newly introduced ultra-small, portable device pump — weighing only 11g and measuring just 12.9 mm x 24.2 mm — delivers very consistent, linear transfer up to 500 mL/min.

In addition to ultra-small size and wide flow rate range, the NMP 03 offers a long service life, outstanding efficiency, leak tightness, and quiet, low-vibration operation. Typical portable device applications, for which the NMP 03 micro gas pump is very well suited, include: emissions measurement and gas analyzers; patient monitoring; capnography; negative pressure wound therapy; ion-mobility spectrometry (trace detection); drugs and explosives detection; handheld pipette/dosing; and print-head meniscus control.

The NMP 03 offers a wide operating temperature range of -20 °C – +60 °C (environment and gas) thereby making it well-suited for outdoor use and applications involving hot or cold gases. Plus, like other KNF micro gas pumps, the new NMP 03 features a modular system which can be configured to match your specific requirements.

Visit www.knfusa.com/NMP03 to learn more.

Trade Show Demo Features KNF Micro Vacuum Pump

Throughout the year, we’ve noticed a demonstration unit that caught our attention on the show floors of BIOMEDevice San Jose, SLAS and MD&M West. This demo – created and displayed by AllMotion – highlights the ability of their four-axis controller board, and utilizes a KNF Micro Gas Pump to create vacuum for stacking and unstacking marbles at a dizzying speed. AllMotion is a California-based manufacturer of stepper drives, stepper controllers, servo drives and servo controllers.

The demo illustrates the ability of the AllMotion board to run motors through four axis of movement and calculate the associated trajectories, while simultaneously running the KNF Micro Gas Pump, a vacuum switch, limit switches, and LEDs – all in a perfectly-timed ballet of motion.

Continue reading

KNF Demo to Debut at SLAS 2015

In just a few short days, some of us here at KNF will be leaving for our nation’s capital to attend the 4th annual SLAS Conference and Exhibition, being held from February 8th-10th. We are particularly excited about this year’s SLAS event as we will be unveiling a brand new demonstration at the KNF Neuberger booth (# 1511).

The new KNF demonstration effectively showcases a number of real-world pump applications, including: direct liquid transfer, vacuum aspiration, and pneumatics via 3 unique KNF pumps. When initiated, the demo cycles continuously through three separate stages. Light-up placards provide clarity for the viewer by explicitly stating which of the following processes is being performed in the demo:

KNF Pump Applications Demo

The KNF demo cycles through Vacuum Aspiration, Onboard Pneumatics, & Direct Liquid Transfer.

1) Vacuum Aspiration– The first process (pictured right) shows fluid being aspirated by the suction created from a powerful vacuum pump. You may notice the system’s ability to generate vacuum-over-liquid easily and quickly – this is due to the selection of a pump with a high gas flow rate, and the ability to handle moist gas with slugs of liquid.

2) Onboard Pneumatics– The next stage demonstrates high pneumatic performance in a compact, quiet and energy-efficient manner. The system employs a micro gas pump to pressurize a pneumatic cylinder which, in turn, raises a tube – a similar function to needle aspiration which is performed for various medical applications.

3) Direct Liquid Transfer– The 3rd process demonstrates direct liquid transfer, using a diaphragm liquid pump. Here, direct transfer of liquid media is made possible using a specially-designed, two-headed pump with high self-priming ability, and smooth flow – ideal for demanding, real-world applications, such as direct handling of liquid waste.

While each stage of the demo illustrates a unique application, it’s important to note the commonalities amongst the stages: First, each pump/stage includes chemically-resistant materials, which allow for the transfer of aggressive media. Each pump also utilizes a brushless DC (BLDC) motor. The BLDC motor (available for most KNF pumps) enables more precise speed control, lowers audible noise and vibration, and promotes a longer lifetime of operation. Also, a new KNF Digital Control provides enhanced programmable features over previous analog controllers while promoting consistent performance and reliability. Tested to over 1.6 million on/off cycles and 100,000+ hours in pump life tests, the KNF Digital Controller offers superior performance in demanding applications.


If you’re going to be at SLAS next week please stop by the KNF Neuberger booth (#1511) to check out our new demo, and to learn more about KNF’s range of gas and liquid OEM pumps.

Making the Right Choice for Drop-on-Demand Inkjet Printing

KNF has supplied the drop-on-demand inkjet printing market with optimized liquid and gas/vacuum pumps since its infancy. Overtime, the market has developed, and we’ve accumulated an in-depth knowledge of these printing systems by working directly with designers to develop pumps best suited for several critical functions. We’re proud to have contributed to the market’s successful evolution, which now includes commercial printers and decorators, 3D printers, bio-material dispensing, single-pass printing, ceramics, and printed electronics.

Typical functions that our pumps perform in drop-on-demand inkjet applications include:

  • Bulk ink supply/replenish
  • Ink degassing
  • System vacuum
  • Cleaning station
  • Ink recirculation
  • Print head temperature control
  • Liquid laminate delivery
  • Media pre-treatment
  • Anti-siphon at head

Whether your application calls for tolerance to special inks, high temperature pump heads, special electrical or mounting connections, or other unique requirements, count on KNF engineers to build a pump to fit your specific inkjet printer needs. We’re here to help you cut costs, and to integrate our pumps into your printer control systems.

View the complete Application Note for more information, including a list of KNF pumps for drop-on-demand inkjet printing

KNF Team Members Demonstrate Pump Power at Open House

Recently, KNF hosted an Open House for employees and families at the US pump manufacturing facility in Trenton, NJ. At the event, KNF associates showcased a number of demonstrations featuring everything from customized OEM pumps used in high-tech medical equipment, to explosion-proof Industrial Process pumps, and even the latest RC 900 Rotary Evaporator system for laboratory applications. Guests of the event were fascinated as they slowly moved through the tour, learning about the diverse applications of which KNF pumps are a critical part.

Joe Alcamo, KNF USA Technical Director, commented on the team demonstrations: “It’s great that we are able to show our family and friends the power and versatility of the products that we produce, and to showcase some of the unique functions performed by our pumps with important applications.”

KNF Micro Diaphragm Gas Pump fits in palm of handKNF Micro Diaphragm Gas Pump demonstration with bowling ball One of the demonstrations that caught the attention of guests was presented by the KNF Engineering team and involved the lifting of a 17 lb. bowling ball by a micro gas pump no larger than a quarter! Typically, the small size of these pumps make them ideal for use in portable, hand-held, gas monitoring devices.

In the demo, a KNF NMP 05 micro-diaphragm gas pump was connected to the base of a suction cup, which rested on top of a bowling ball (pictured right).

When turned on, the tiny gas pump created a vacuum in just under 5 seconds, that was strong enough to enable the suction cup to lift the 17 lb. bowling ball.

The KNF facility tour and pump demonstrations were capped off with a picnic lunch, where employees and guests sat together to enjoy a family style barbeque in the warmth of the late summer sun.

Visit knfoem.com/micro-air to learn more about KNF micro gas pumps.
To learn more about KNF Neuberger Inc. click here.