Is It Time To Replace Your Water Aspirator?

A water aspirator is a simple device capable of creating a low strength vacuum for many standard laboratory applications. Though they are inexpensive to purchase and easy to use, the long-term operating costs and environmental impact of laboratory water aspirators can be quite significant.

The above video from Lab Manager follows Linda the Lab Manager as she and her colleagues investigate the real costs of owning and operating a laboratory water aspirator.

Video: Choosing the Best Vacuum Pump for Your Lab Application

 

Are you in the market for a new laboratory vacuum pump? Perhaps you need more information on which pump to choose. A new video, produced by Lab Manager, may provide valuable insights. View the video directly above, or click here.

New KNF Laboratory Products Catalog Available

KNF Neuberger Inc. has recently published an updated Laboratory Products Catalog. The 33-page catalog reflects the newly expanded range of laboratory products offered by KNF Neuberger, Inc. which includes: a complete line of vacuum pumps and accessories, liquid transfer pumps, dosing/metering pumps, rotary evaporators, and vacuum systems.

Organized by application, this comprehensive guide presents the best product selections for rotary evaporation/distillation, degassing, filtration/SPE, fluid aspiration, gel drying, centrifugal concentration, vacuum ovens, multi-user vacuum systems, and metering and transferring liquid. In addition, this piece includes handy product charts for easy comparison.

View the new Laboratory Products Catalog here. Or, request a high-resolution printed version via postal mail by completing the form below.

KNF Associates Discuss MedTech Pump Design Trends with MDDI

Pumps for Medical TechnologyThe following excerpt is from the MDDI article, “Pump Designs Flow Toward Smaller Sizes“.


As medical devices require smaller pumps that fulfill rigorous design requirements, the relationship between OEMs and suppliers is shifting.

A medical device that manages the movement of a gas or a fluid relies on a pump to carry out the application. Advances in technology enable pump suppliers to provide pumps capable of addressing increasingly complex medical device requirements. But industry pressures are also changing the nature of the relationship between OEMs and their suppliers.

At one time, medical device companies looked at suppliers simply as a way to outsource work and reduce costs, said Dave Vanderbeck, business development manager for Trenton, NJ-based KNF Neuberger. While suppliers can help OEMs reduce their costs, Vanderbeck increasingly now sees OEMs turning to their pump suppliers for design expertise.

Read the full article at MDDIonline.com >>

KNF to Host Lab Pumps & Applications Symposium in Collaboration with Local ACS

Pumps are an important component in practically all chemistry laboratories. Yet for such a common device, selecting the correct pump for a particular application is often a challenge.

Join us for a Laboratory Pumps and Applications Symposium

Join us on Nov. 4th for a Laboratory Pumps & Applications Symposium

KNF Neuberger, in collaboration with the Trenton Section of the American Chemical Society, will be hosting a symposium on “Laboratory Pumps and Applications”. The presentation will focus on taking the mystery out of laboratory pumps, looking at the most common applications and the pumps that best support them. Discussion topics include:

  • What is the best pump type for my application?
  • What accessories are available to help me optimize the performance of the pump in my application?
  • What are the signs that my pump is in need of maintenance or repair?
  • And much more!


LOCATION

This exclusive, co-sponsored event will be held at KNF’s state-of-the-art, 50,000 square ft. manufacturing facility at Two Black Forest Road in Trenton, NJ.

SCHEDULE
5:30 pm – Mixer with drinks and appetizers, plant tours and product demos
6:30 pm – Dinner and presentation
7:30 pm – Coffee and dessert
Refreshments and dinner are complimentary. There will also be a drawing for door prizes.

PRESENTER
Roland Anderson is the Laboratory Products Manager and applications specialist at KNF Neuberger, Inc.

RSVP
Reservations are required, as seating is limited, so be sure to register now!

The Right Pump to Meet Your Continuous Ink-jet Printing Requirements

Application Note: OEMAs the continuous ink-jet (CIJ) printing industry evolves, KNF remains a driving force behind the change from yesterday’s peristaltic and gear driven pumps, to today’s more efficient diaphragm pumps. In fact, KNF is well positioned to serve this industry, thanks to our CIJ applications knowledge and selection of readily-optimized liquid and gas handling diaphragm pumps.

Diaphragm pumps overcome common problems inherent with the use of peristaltic and gear pumps in CIJ applications. Peristaltic pumps have short tube life leading to maintenance issues or messy clean-up, while gear pumps have issues including performance decay, shed particles, high cost, and they cannot run dry. In contrast, our diaphragm pumps provide a greatly extended performance life, lower cost operation, leak-tightness, robust chemical resistance, the ability to handle challenging inks, and our liquid pumps are self-priming and can run wet or dry. In addition, KNF diaphragm pumps can include features such as logic-controlled brushless DC motors, special electrical connections and mounting plates, and dampeners for applications sensitive to pulsation.

Air, Gas & Liquid Diaphragm Pumps for Continuous Ink-jet Printers

KNF Neuberger, Inc. specializes in liquid transfer pumps for continuous ink-jet printing industry. Specific media applications include UV ink pumps, pumps for solvent-based inks, degassing pumps, and many more.

Typical functions that our pumps perform in drop-on-demand inkjet applications include:

  • Bulk ink supply/replenish
  • Ink degassing
  • System vacuum and pressure
  • Cleaning station
  • Anti-siphon at head
  • Gutter pump
  • Chemistry make up
  • Ink delivery
  • Debris cleaning
  • QC analysis

KNF is also proud to have contributed to the CIJ market’s successful evolution to now include industrial printers and decorators, mailing and labeling equipment, date/lot codes, bio-material dispensing, 3-D printers, printed electronics, and more.

View the complete Application Note for more information, including a list of KNF pumps for continuous ink-jet printing and a more complete list of KNF pump features and benefits for CIJ applications.

10 Questions With… Michelle Taylor (Part 2)

Michelle Taylor Laboratory Equipment MagazineToday we conclude our “10 Questions with…” interview of Michelle Taylor, Editor-in-Chief of Laboratory Equipment magazine.

Click here to read the first installment of this conversation.

6. As internet and social media use grow in our industry, have manufacturers expanded their communications to provide technical data and guidance on the proper use of key laboratory equipment in these channels?

My experience has been that manufacturers have capitalized on social media channels, but not necessarily to provide technical data. I think most people see social media as an “outlet,” meaning they are anticipating/expecting less technical, more “fun” information. Most manufacturers use social media as a means to converse with their existing and potential customers, using interesting, meaningful information and data to suck them in. Once you get the customer on your site, that’s when you hit them with the technical data and guidance. Not everyone wants that kind of information filling up their leisure time, so I think it’s best to entice them first, and then let them find what they are looking for from there.

7. Do you see the remote control of laboratory equipment as a growing trend?

Yes times 100. The remote control of everything is a trend, and it’s amplified in the laboratory. It’s one of the rare times science is ahead of the consumer world in terms of trends. Remote control of laboratory equipment is so important that it’s hard to know where to start. I conduct reader surveys every month and in the past four or five years, ease-of-use is the capability our readers have expressed the most interest in. And there’s nothing easier than using a remote to control your lab equipment from a distance. It saves time and money, increases productivity and makes researchers happy- what’s not to love? More importantly though, remote control increases lab safety and aids energy efficiency. Having the ability to control a pump or other piece of equipment inside a fume hood without opening the sash will prove vital in future research endeavors.

8. With the growth of Green Initiatives, do you see more laboratory equipment shifting to less hazardous materials of construction with more sophisticated monitoring and control features?

Yes, but I would downplay the green initiatives part- in a way at least. A few years ago when green was a buzzword, the industry started changing in an effort to accommodate this shift. So we did see a rise in less hazardous materials, better monitoring, smarter construction, etc. Since then though, green has become less of a buzzword and more like something we just accept in society. I think companies are shifting to more energy-efficient and eco-friendly options now not because it’s the “cool new thing,” but because it is what is expected- like stopping at a red light. Green initiatives are not so much initiatives anymore as they are just a part of how we conduct business in the real world. So, yes to smarter, better, more eco-friendly options, but no to green initiatives as a directive.

9. What do you think is the biggest pain-point for lab teams across the globe? How do they address this?

I addressed this briefly in question 7, but I’d say ease-of-use. Researchers everywhere are demanding easier-to-use instrumentation and software. There’s a shortage of experienced personnel, and labs everywhere are feeling that constrain. Therefore, instrumentation and software must be easier to use so novice users can handle the demands, while experienced researchers turn their attention toward more revenue-generating opportunities and research. Manufacturers are already addressing this with simple, familiar, consumer-driven interfaces for software, as well as advanced platforms that guide and help researchers. They are also investing in ways to simplify complex instrumentation, like spectrometers and chromatographs. Two years ago, for example, Waters debuted their QDa detector, which brings push-button mass spec to chromatography applications. I think we will begin to see a lot of more of this.

10. Finally, to end our conversation on a light note, please tell our readers what your favorite city across the globe is.

Hm, this is a hard one. Can I pick two? Actually, I don’t care, I have to pick two. Assisi (Italy) and Galway (Ireland) are my favorites. Climbing the hill to get up to Assisi is unreal. I thought I was going to pass out. But it is all worth it when you get to the top. The view is breathtaking, especially at sunset or during a storm.

In reference to Galway, I swear the greens and blues in Ireland are different than in the U.S. Nature is just better there—the grass is greener, the sky is bluer and the contrast is prettier. Plus, there are lambs everywhere- and lambs are too cute.